Words without meaning

question man 2          Listening to conversations, I am fascinated with the development of our language. I hear a new word being used which is “texted”. In reality, text is a noun. Trying to make it a verb is an interesting experiment, but the reality is “I did text him” is correct whereas, “I texted him” isn’t. Nevertheless, “texted” seems to be growing in popularity even if it isn’t correct.

Another one that is different is the word “conversate”. There is no word “conversate” in the dictionary, but as much as I hear it being used, it will probably be there in a few years.The word “prioritize” didn’t exist until the political campaign of 1979, and now it is part of life. So I guess I need to prioritize my texted information so I can conversate properly. No wonder the British say we don’t speak English, we speak American.

I put some new words in my new book, “Hook, Line & Sinker”  which is the sequel novel to “Catch and Release” a top winner in Romance/Mystery International Competition at the 2012 London Book Festival; 2012 Los Angeles Book Fair ; 2012 Beach Book show; 2012 New England Book Show; and Winner Best Audiobook 2013 Paris Book Festival. Take a look at my website  www.JTwerell.com.    OR  Click here for Amazon PageI

The Sequel

Several of my books received comments suggesting a sequel. Never wrote a sequel so the suggestions stirred my inner places and I decided to try. I love reading sequels as I have a bond with the characters and want to see them in different situations, but writing a sequel is a different story.

I decided to try with my novel CATCH and RELEASE, which won several awards and has a popular following, a helpful item when you expect people to know who the characters are in the book. But what about the people who don’t? I just couldn’t start a dialog between Jennifer and Steve if the reader had no clue who Jennifer and Steve were from other interactions. (If you never read CATCH and RELEASE, you can now easily identify with my quandary).  I found a sequel was similar to weaving a tapestry where you use enough old material to make the reader comfortable yet add lots of new things to make the story exciting.

I hope I wove properly, but only the reader will be able to judge. The new book will be out in October and is called “HOOK, LINE & SINKER” and is a continuing adventure of Dr. Steve Sanders and Special Agent Jennifer Blade. If you don’t know these two people and can’t wait for October to read HOOK, LINE & SINKER, then go to Amazon and pick up a copy of CATCH and RELEASE. (Click here)

Here is the cover from Catch and Release:BookCoveraudio3x3.do copy

And here is the new sequel:  final cover

And here is the promo: 

You can always find more at Amazon (click here)

Or my Website (click here)

Would love to have your thoughts:

Politically Correct

This is definitely the age of being politically correct. As I found out doing this blog, it is easy to offend somebody when that is the last thing on my mind. I did some checking and here are some of the politiaclly correct terms for today.
Illegal Immigrant —- Undocumented Worker
Global Warming —- Climate Change
Liberal, Socialist, Communist —- Progressive
Conservative —- Wingnut
Illegal Voter —- Undocumented Citizen
Failure —- Pre-achiever
Drug Dealer —- Undocumented Pharmacist
Smack, Meth, Crack, Weed —- Non-prescribed Pharmaceuticals
Bribe —- Unearned Bonus
Kickback —- Public Service Bonus
Crook —- Pre-ethical Citizen
Wanted Criminal —- Person of Interest
Polygamy —- Undocumented Multicultural Marriage
Earmark —- Investment in District
Deficit —- Investment by Future Workers
Dropout —- Undocumented Early Graduate
Con Artist —- Undocumented Attorney
Politician —- Un-indicted Co-conspirator
Death —- Healthcare Cost Reduction
Dead —- Reduced Carbon Footprint

These are just some of what is now “PC”.Therefore, from this point forward please do not refer to me as old;
I am not old, I am chronologically gifted.

Analogies

snoopy

As an author, I spend a lot of time reading other peoples work to get an idea of how they approach their art. It is amazing how some people create words and sentences that make little or no sense. For example: “Last October 30 people disappeared without anyone being notified, except possibly the last people who saw them disappear.” What??

The ones I really love are analogies. Good analogies act like mirrors to give us an additional perspective on a subject. (That was an analogy) Or perhaps we could say a good analogy brings life to a thought like spice bring new flavor to a meal. (hmmm, not sure I liked that one). Here are some I have found that really make me wonder:

  • She caught your eye like one of those pointy hook latches that used to dangle from screen doors and would fly up whenever you banged the door open again.
  • The little boat gently drifted across the pond exactly the way a bowling ball wouldn’t.
  • McBride fell 12 stories, hitting the pavement like a Hefty Bag filled with vegetable soup.
  • From the attic came an unearthly howl. The whole scene had an eerie, surreal quality, like when you’re on vacation in another city and “Jeopardy” comes on at 7:00 p.m. instead of 7:30.
  • Her hair glistened in the rain like nose hair after a sneeze.

Like nose hair after a sneeze!!!!! Not a line from Hemingway for sure. You have any favorite analogies, please share.

Movable Feast

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Ernest Hemingway’s writing is the greatest creative joy I have ever found. I am sure many will disagree with me, but I really don’t care. Every once in a while I have to read Movable Feast just to remember why I ever decided to write books. I will never duplicate his genius, but it is good to sit with the gods every once in a while and just feel good. If you loth long rambling sentences, don’t read the following. If you want to once more fall in love with the written word, then this is for you.

All of the sadness of the city came suddenly with the first cold rains of winter, and there were no more tops to the high white houses as you walked but only the wet blackness of the street and the closed doors of the small shops, the herb sellers, the stationery and the newspaper shops, the midwife – second class – and the hotel where Verlaine had died, where I had a room on the top floor where I worked. 

Don’t easily admit it, but I think I just had an orgasm.

Any positive thought are welcome.

ANALOGIES ?

reader

As an author, I spend a lot of time reading other peoples work to get an idea of how they approach their art. It is amazing how some people create words and sentences that make little or no sense. For example: “Last October 30 people disappeared without anyone being notified, except possibly the last people who saw them disappear.” What??

The ones I really love are analogies. Good analogies act like mirrors to give us an additional perspective on a subject. (That was an analogy) Or perhaps we could say a good analogy brings life to a thought like spice bring new flavor to a meal. (hmmm, not sure I liked that one). Here are some I have found that really make me wonder:

  • She caught your eye like one of those pointy hook latches that used to dangle from screen doors and would fly up whenever you banged the door open again.
  • The little boat gently drifted across the pond exactly the way a bowling ball wouldn’t.
  • McBride fell 12 stories, hitting the pavement like a Hefty Bag filled with vegetable soup.
  • From the attic came an unearthly howl. The whole scene had an eerie, surreal quality, like when you’re on vacation in another city and “Jeopardy” comes on at 7:00 p.m. instead of 7:30.
  • Her hair glistened in the rain like nose hair after a sneeze.

Like nose hair after a sneeze!!!!! Not a line from Hemingway for sure.

If you join our blog then you will find peace like Gandhi found at a spinning wheel. If you dont, then life will be missing joy like a wedding caught in the rain. Or something like that. Comments are always welcome.

EDITORS

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“Placing his hand on the chair, he looked out the window.”

There was a time I thought this was a good sentence. Then an editor took a yellow pencil to my manuscript and began to kill every “ING” she could find. The simple explanation provided was “ing and ed can not live together”. Thus the above sentence became, “He placed his hand on the chair and looked out the window.” Or “Looking out the window, he tightly held the chair.”

Another editor informed me I could not use contractions in non-dialog sections of writing. So the sentence, “The two of them wouldn’t move because they didn’t know where to go.”  now becomes, “The two of them would not move because they did not know where to go.”

These are useful lessons and I think they improve my work. The only problem is, I often have more concern about the grammar than the story, which is not good for the creative process.

Editors can be frustrating, but thank God for them.

JTT